NSFW: Scientists from the University of Ottawa finally understand the female orgasm

NSFW: Scientists from the University of Ottawa finally understand the female orgasm

When Meg Ryan started moaning and groaning in the midst of a busy diner in When Harry Met Sally to prove how easy it was for women to fake pleasure in the bedroom, she definitely had a point.

For scientists have found that vocal reactions are no way to tell if a woman is really in the throats of ecstasy.

They said that the way that orgasms are measured should be redefined because “pleasurable satisfaction” was instead the best way to quantify the feeling.

Scientists from the University of Ottawa asked more than 600 women aged 18 to 82 about their experiences of orgasm both in solitary and partnered contexts.

They included questions on both the Orgasm Rating Scale and the Bodily Sensations of Orgasm Scale – both commonly used in scientific research into the sensation.

Fake, fake, fake, fake.
Camera IconFake, fake, fake, fake. Credit: Supplied

The women were asked the degree to which they experienced feelings of quivering, shuddering, sweating, faster breathing and facial tingling, plus many more.

Results, published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine, revealed that across all age groups “pleasurable satisfaction” was reported as the most common ORS item.

Emotional intimacy and shooting sensations were the least common on the ORS scale.

Genital sensations and spasms plus sweating, were the most common BSOS items.

On the other hand, moaning was one of the least common – with the researchers even suggesting it should be removed from the scale entirely.

They hope their findings could be used to improve interventions for women who are unsatisfied with their orgasm experience.

The team wrote: “We recommend that ‘moaning’ be removed from the measure permanently.”

“All other items appear to relate to involuntary responses occurring throughout the orgasm experience.”

They added that previous research has indicated a disconnection between the timing of women experiencing an orgasm and vocalizations such as moaning, with the suggestion there may be at least a part of these responses “under women’s conscious control”.

However, they said overall the ORS and BSOS are effective measures of the female orgasm.

“With valid measurement options…we will learn more about women’s orgasms and be able to provide more effective clinical services for women who experience difficulties with orgasm or find the experience lacking in satisfaction,” they concluded.

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